13 June 2014

What's a PK anyway?

There are so many abbreviations around I have trouble keeping up! But despite the continents apart, the different nationalities and cultural differences, the sentence "I'm a PK" seems to be understood.

PK = Pastor's Kid/Clergy Kid/Preacher's Kid/Minister's Kid

What's underlying are many similarities, despite denomination or institution. I want to share with you some of the things PKs have written about or shared with us to give you an idea of the realities of the life that comes with the title.

PKs are interlinked with similarities. They know that weekends are often the busiest time of the week. They understand that religion isn't very popular anymore and at the same time, in the church environment, everyone is looking not only at your mum and dad for guidance, help and biblical insight, but also at YOU, watching with a close eye to see what you do, where you go, who you hang out with, how 'Christian' you are in everyday life.
PKs are often among the first to get to church and the last to leave. They understand that Christmas and Easter aren't so much about 'family time', but about running outreach activities, singing carols and waiting for your parents to recover enough from running the services so that you can sit down to a family meal - usually shared with others who need a family when theirs is absent.

PKs can be thrust into the spotlight, expected to pick up the slack if people are running late in the roster, or to run tea and coffee after church if people don't show up. They're often the ones who sit in the front pews and become sermon examples for the rest of the congregation. PKs watch their parents transform into different people than when they are at home. They understand that home is another place to do ministry.

But they're also the ones who learn compassion. Who have an insight into complex community living that some never see. They become expert babysitters, musicians, speakers, leaders, writers, singers, counsellors, caterers. They are entrusted with tasks, thoughts, and relationships. And by the time they leave home, they have a wide range of work and life experience that employers see as incredible.

Their abilities are varied, their insight unique and personalities just as amazing as everyone else.